Athletes brave extreme temperatures as New York City heatwave shortens in triathlon

New York City’s triathletes braved scorching temperatures Sunday as the heat wave continued to satiate the Big Apple — but some participants shrugged off the inclement weather.

Race organizers shortened the cycling portion of the event from 24.8 miles to 12.4 miles and the running event from 6.2 miles to 2.5 miles due to the heatwave that extended into its sixth day.

Brazilian-born Danilo Pimentel, who won the men’s competition, told The Post that the race wasn’t a race.

“I was born in the Amazon, this temperature is normal! The 35-year-old said.

“They did really well, the track is really tough, up and down the hills,” he said of his competitors.

“I was a bit sexy to be honest,” admitted the women’s professional race winner, Amy Summerman of Rochester.

But the 30-year-old professional said she was prepared for the boiling temperatures.

“I was hydrating all the time with water and electrolytes, and I was in bed by 7:30 last night!” She said.

However, she said, “I would have loved the 10K game, I wouldn’t lie.”

Athletes run a triathlon in New York City on Sunday as spectators look on.
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A young athlete vomits from hot weather at the Finnish New York Triathlon Line in Central Park.  New York City.  Manhattan.  New York, NY July 24, 2022. nypostinhouse (Kevin C. Downs for The New York Post.
A young athlete vomits from hot weather at the finish line at the New York Triathlon in Central Park.
Kevin C. Downs for The New York Post
Nicole Falcaro celebrates winning third place in the New York City Women's Triathlon
Nicole Falcaro celebrates winning third place in the New York City Women’s Triathlon.
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The athletes were out of the races on Sunday at 6:30 a.m. — 40 minutes after their scheduled start time — when the temperature was already in the low 80s.

“While it is disappointing to reduce the length of both races, our number one priority is to do everything we can to ensure the safety and welfare of competitors, volunteers, medical staff and spectators,” the New York City Triathlon announced via another Facebook post Thursday.

The decision came two months after a runner died after completing the Brooklyn Half Marathon on an unusually warm morning, and three years after the annual Big Apple triathlon was canceled entirely due to high temperatures.

Tim Cranston, 68, who traveled from Denver, Colorado to attend the race, lamented the reduced race length.

Amy Summerman, 30, Rochester, New York
“I was a bit sexy to be honest,” admitted the women’s professional race winner, Amy Summerman of Rochester.
Danilo Pimentel, 35, Brazil
Brazilian-born Danilo Pimentel, who won the men’s competition, told The Post that the race wasn’t a race.

“It’s too bad they cut it in half! I started 40 minutes late and there was no current to swim, which makes it more difficult, but more than half of the athletes were early adopters and I didn’t see anyone struggling there,” the retiree said.

“I definitely think they made a mistake, everyone could have handled the full distance, for sure.”

“The heat wasn’t as bad as I expected,” Alex Knisilak—a graphic designer from Fort Lee, New Jersey—told The Post.

Photo: New York City Triathlon 2022.
Race organizers shortened the cycling portion of the event from 24.8 miles to 12.4 miles and the running event from 6.2 miles to 2.5 miles.
GNMiller / NYPost
Photo: New York City Triathlon 2022.
New York City triathletes braved the scorching temperatures Sunday as the heat wave continued to bake the Big Apple.
GNMiller / NYPost
Athletes enter the water during a triathlon in New York City on Sunday.
Athletes enter the water during a triathlon in New York City on Sunday.
GNMiller / NYPost

It’s fun this morning,” said the 51-year-old.

However, he added, it was a “good idea that they stopped it.”

Elise Salpeter, 55, a sales representative from Nassau County, expressed her relief at the race’s short cut.

“I was glad it was reduced, I was worried about the heat. I took the gels, and stopped at every water station, so I was able to do it because of this heat. But I’ll be honest, it was hot!” Salpeter, 55, told the newspaper. “I think it was a smart move to lower it.”

Arno Bruhe, who owns a construction company and lives in Manhattan, was also grateful that he had to spend less time in the scorching sun.

Some athletes said interrupting the race due to the heat was a mistake.
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“It was so hot! I’m glad they cut it short. At first I got really upset, but they stopped, but the heat, I had leg cramps in the running section, and if they didn’t cut it, I would have been in real trouble,” said Brohi, 40.

“The heat was brutal!” declared Blaise Barron, a 54-year-old IT worker.

“It was a good call,” the Upper West Side resident told The Post. I saw one or two [people] Getting medical help, because they’ve fallen, but I haven’t seen a single person really in heat or in crisis, so they made the right call.”

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