Why can moths that have sex on our faces go extinct at night and why is that a bad thing

                    Microorganisms called Demodex folliculorum live on our hair and feed on the oils in the pores of our skin.  At night, they leave the follicles to find mates, find new follicles for sex and lay eggs

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                        Demodex folliculorum lives on our hair and nourishes the oils in the pores of our skin, 18 . news


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            Scientists have found that tiny moths that have sex on our faces at night could face extinction.

Yes, you read that correctly.

The results published in the journal show that these microorganisms, which are only 0.3 millimeters long, are at risk of extinction due to inbreeding and gene loss. Molecular biology and evolution show up.

Let’s take a closer look at what they are, where they are found and why they can say goodbye:

what are they?

according to Discover MagazineThese tiny creatures called Demodex folliculorum live on our hair and feed on the oils in the pores of our skin.

At night, they leave the follicles to find mates, find new follicles in which they have sex and lay their eggs.

Where are they found?

They are often found on the eyelashes, eyebrows, or near the nose.

Wait, how did they get there?

The main way it spreads in humans is by jumping from the mother’s nipple to the baby’s face during breastfeeding. It is found in more than 90 percent of people

Yikes. Should I wash my face?

It doesn’t matter.

They are etched deep into our skin.

Besides, said Dr Alejandra Perotti of the University of Reading, who co-authored the study Sky News “We should love them because they are the only animals that live on our bodies all our lives and we should appreciate them because they clean our pores.”

On top of that, she’s cute, Perotti added.

So what’s the problem?

The problem is inbreeding.

Regardless of mother-to-child transmission, both mites and their offspring remain in one human, according to Discover Magazine.

Experts say they have mated for more than 1,200 generations from the time the host was first infected until the host’s death. This is similar to the intermarriage of your ancestors with relatives for 30,000 years.

This, of course, has a cost.

Researchers have found changes in his DNA, which lead to unusual body traits and behaviors, according to Down To Earth.

Also, the species has become very simple, living with a minimal supply of proteins – the lowest among related species, the researchers explain.

The loss in genes also leads to a drastic reduction in the number of cells in adult mites — a possible first evolutionary step in their journey toward adopting a completely symbiotic lifestyle within our tissues, according to Watchman.

These modifications are the cause of the problem. The more they adapt to us, the more genes they lose, and eventually they will become completely dependent on us for their existence.

Because of this dependence, they will not be able to leave our pores and find a new companion to be paired with, as stated BBC.

Their isolated existence and resulting inbreeding may have eventually put the moths on an evolutionary dead end.

This is bad because?

Only if you love healthy skin.

“It’s linked to healthy skin, so if we lose it you can have problems with your skin,” Perotti . said BBC.

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